Cycling to work lowers risk of death by 20% (NIHR)

31 August 2020

Cycling to work versus driving has been shown to reduce the risk of premature death by 20%, death by cardiovascular complications by 24% and cancer by 16%, a National Institute for Health Research study of Census data has found.

Cycling to work versus driving has been shown to reduce the risk of premature death by 20%, death by cardiovascular complications by 24% and cancer by 16%, a National Institute for Health Research study of Census data has found.

The analysis took place as the Government has urged against all but necessary use of public transport, which leaves many commuters seeking an alternative. At the peak of lockdown, with the roads generally quiet many took to cycling for transport, but with traffic levels returning to normal there are concerns of a reversal beyond levels previously seen; something that would further deter active travel and increase pollution.

“The current pandemic is an opportunity to rethink many aspects of society. If fewer people are travelling by public transport due to social distancing, more will be driving to work.

“This could increase the risk of death and disease as well as impacting air quality in urban areas. Policies which aim to increase walking, cycling, and public transport could also reduce air pollution,” wrote the Institute.

Read the full article here.